pixEOS Art Gallery: 70 Years in the Making

in #art10 months ago (edited)

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"70 Years in the Making" is new rare digital art by Joe Chiappetta which depicts an oscilloscope from the 1950s. It is animation that provides a modern-day glimpse into our art history roots--70 years in the making, and is one of the many artworks available in the pixEOS Gallery.

During the early 1950s in Iowa, Ben Laposky created some of the earliest known electronic visual art. He used an oscilloscope, which is a device that turns voltage into moving lines of light. He recognized these patterns/designs as unique artworks, and called them "electrical compositions" as well as "electronic abstractions." Back then, the only way Laposky knew to potentially monetize his animated creations was to take black and white photos of his abstract designs and exhibit them. Ben was a mathematician, Purple Heart recipient, and remarkable pioneer in the arts.

The steady advancement of computers in the decades to come would entice more artists into the (literally electrifying) field of electronic arts, both analog and digital. Seventy years later, excitement and innovation continues to run high in the electronic arts, with no signs of slowing down. This is especially true in the 5 year old field of rare digital art.

Attention continues to increase for online digital art markets--made even more apparent by the March 2020 closing of all physical museums and galleries due to the spread of a worldwide disease. Despite these global health issues, art collectors remain active with a real appetite to collect blockchain-registered art. All made possible--of course--through electricity, these artworks are issued in limited editions and tied to cryptographic tech running in the background. Just as cryptography regulates Bitcoin in a verifiably limited supply, the same is true for artworks, hence the name rare digital art. Also known as non-fungible tokens (NFTs), art ownership, release dates, sales history, and artist authenticity are automated through global computer networks.

The technology to issue rare digital art keeps evolving. The latest in this evolution is the Grand pixEOS Art Gallery. With its March 2020 launch, a few features of the pixEOS Gallery are worth highlighting.

  1. Gallery transactions (buying/selling) are fast--like blazing fast. That can be attributed to the team being active in the industry for many years and the fact that the EOS blockchain, on which the gallery operates, is known for its speed.

  2. The artists in the gallery are a widely diverse blend of international talent. Some have been "around the blockchain" for many years, some are longtime pro artists yet new to rare digital art, and some are emerging artists grateful to gain instant access to global sales potential for their creative works.

  3. Art collectors buy the rare digital art using EOS tokens or PIXEOS tokens, depending on how the artist chooses to list for sale.

  4. Each collector gets their own unique page to exhibit their prized possessions and/or resell them for a potential profit.

  5. Each time an artist's work is resold (when the collector who buys the work sells it to another collector), the artist receives a percentage of these secondary sales automatically.

  6. Artwork can be auctioned off or sold for a fixed price.

  7. Simple and complex motion is often added by artists to their static original artworks, creating a new animated art marketplace. Using GIF format, animations are widely created and collected.

While it is unfortunate that legendary electronic art pioneers of decades-gone-by were not able to utilize this exciting new way to distribute, monetize, and collect electronic artwork, many remain grateful to be active in such a lively legacy that has become a digital art revolution.
To the future... to the pixEOS Gallery!