I'm reading Reinvent Yourself by James Altucher

in #books3 years ago

Reinvent-Yourself.jpeg

I like James Altucher

My personality is very different from his and I think he overshares... but that's part of what makes him like-able.

If you are not that much of a reader, but want to get started with Personal Development or business, this is a good book to read. His paragraphs are very short, often only one sentence. His chapters are easy reading and can be read in sections that often stand on their own.

There are a lot of ideas that are very challenging to the "normal" way that people attempt to live. This book is a good introduction to some of those ideas. I can see that it would get you curious about doing life differently.

This is a "business book", but not a traditional business book. You are a one person business and this book gives you hints and tips on how to run that business better.

A Business Book A Week

I've been trying to read a business book a week. Or at least a book a week. I've mostly been successful with that for the past month or so. I'm a little behind schedule now. I also think of Personal Development books as business books.

If you are trying to improve yourself, but having a tough time getting started, this is a good book for you.

Until next time,

-- @matthewdavid

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What do you mean by oversharing exactly? Like his personal life?

Yes, his personal life is part of it... but we all share that to some extent. It's his thoughts. He writes things about what he thinks that most people wouldn't be comfortable writing about: his failures and embarrassing moments. That honesty gives him the credibility to address uncomfortable or unpopular ideas. So it works for him.

Thanks for the recommendation. This looks interesting to me. I will be sure to check it out.

In the first couple chapters he writes about what lengths he takes to acquire mentors. You may find that interesting. Mentoring is similar to the concept of discipleship. Except that James is the one (mentee) who seeks out the mentor, the teacher, while in discipleship the discipler seems to pick and bring the disciple along (or it seems to me). Doesn't have to be that way, though.

Who is the initiator? The student or the master?