Almost everyone uses solar hot water here (does the rest of the world?)

in #energylast month

I am from the United States and while there have been some efforts over the years I don't recall solar being a very large part of really anyone's day-to-day life. I understand that there are some geographical things that would limit solar energy from being part of the overall electrical paradigm, but it seems to me like things like this would be very helpful, particularly in the parts of the US that have mostly warm temperatures year-round.

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This is located on the roof of my condo building and is also a feature on just about everyone else's as well. I'm not certain about the technical specifications of it but it appears as though the water simply sits inside of those heating tubes and uses the sun in order to create a storage tank of hot (ish) water for the entire building.

It is connected to this tank down the line and I'm guessing that it circulates to a certain degree

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In my condo I have two bathrooms (a situation where I sincerely wish they had instead provided me with one large bathroom instead) and only one of the showers has an electrical hot water system that you have to be quick with because the amount of water that the system is capable of heating up is only going to last you for around a 3 minute shower. Which is more than enough for me but I would be willing to bet that some people with long hair that need shampoo and conditioner treatments probably have to rush in order to get it done.

In the cold months, of which there are around 3 per year, this is really your only source of hot water because even though it doesn't rain very frequently, the sky is almost always foggy and overcast and therefore the solar heaters don't do a great deal.

However, in the clear months, which is most of the year, you don't really even need this electrical hot-water system because the water that is heated by the sun somehow gets hot enough to burn you if you aren't careful with the tap in the shower.


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there is a movement towards green energy here in Vietnam as well but for the most part it is still primarily powered by fossil fuels

So I am curious particularly if you don't live in South East Asia currently: Are these sorts of systems being implemented in the West? When I lived in the USA I lived in a place that had a proper cold winter, however, that doesn't mean that it was never sunny in winter and these sorts of systems seem like they would work there as well. I am curious if this sort of system would even work in that environment. It seems like it would if you were able to keep the snow from gathering on top of it.

From what I can tell these systems don't often break down, which is very different from the solar energy systems that I recall in the United States when I was young.

Does your country use solar? This is the first country that I have lived in where something this practical was just a part of every day life. A majority of Vietnam's power still comes from coal and oil but I think the population is interested in getting as much "free" energy as they possibly can.