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RE: Psychology Addict # 58 | Punishment – An Overview Through the Lens of Psychology.

in #psychologylast year

Behaviour… My current problem (and not at the place in my life you may think about) :)

Modern sociologists agree, for instance, that it is socialisation which mostly brings law and order about, not the police force ref.. I am with them.

I am with you there too, although I would tend to say it depends on the level. For little things, threats of punishment may work for some time, but having people collectively behaving for the common good is much more beneficial. There is here no reason to bring punishment onto the scene. Rewarding the very good ones could yield the same effects than punishing the bad behaviours, of even have a better impact. However, we also need punishment for clear exaggerations at the same time, to define the limits no to cross.

This being said, I would like to emphasise that I rarely punish my kids. But sometimes, it is needed. There are clear lines that should not be crossed (and they (generally) know it).

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Rewarding the very good ones could yield the same effects than punishing the bad behaviours, of even have a better impact.

Many people do offend because they don't even have accesses to the opportunity of being rewarded. If they truly felt social mobility is genuine and accessible to everyone they would not resort to breaking the rules and infringe social norms. In that case rewarding the very good ones could yield even better results indeed.

I am very pleased you have that instance towards your children's upbringing. Of course punishment is important for the development of a child. A child will not bloom into being socially functional if they are left to their own devices, or if only their good behaviour is addressed while the naughty one are ignored.

My next post will be about this. As I see a lot of caregivers refraining from saying "no" to the little ones, or avoiding to set limits to their actions altogether. This is not good for the children's self-esteem, resilience and overall future mental health.

Have a most wonderful week @lemouth.
Wish you and the family all the best, always.

My next post will be about this. As I see a lot of caregivers refraining from saying "no" to the little ones, or avoiding to set limits to their actions altogether.

And I can see the result of that at the university... It is not good, believe me.

I am looking forward to read your next post :)