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RE: Psychology Addict # 56 | Reflections on Anger.

Oh well, I analysed my life a lot while reading your post. Now, I am not the kind of person that gets angry easily. In fact, in my lab, it was a topic of major discussion when I scolded this new student for arguing more and not reading or listening enough. They were all like, where did the sun rise today.

I was wondering why is that. I think it's exactly because I end up rationalising the series of actions to the context, as you described. And what's the point of having a fit of rage over those inevitable circumstances, I think. Though, I have had my fits of rage. Very rare, but they have been there. And I have to agree in most of the times I was feeling being wronged by the person, being violated or demeaned by that person. And I was holding the person responsible. And in those cases even after superficially forgiving the person, making peace etc, I have always held the grudge. And I have not forgotten a single one of those incidences. Like they are somehow important danger memories to be kept alive and whenever possible I should avenge that. A part of my brain knows how wrong is that, but the other part refuses to forgive and forget. Makes me wonder what is the purpose of anger on other animal species. Does any animal show prolonged grudge? Like does anger have a role to play beyond fight part of fight or flight response in them?

Anyway, after thinking a little more, I realized one more thing. The most frequent kind of rage I display is related to someone trying to push me out of my comfort zone. Not entitlement. But I have this dire need of being in my own mind. And it would irritate the hell out of me if someone tries to poke me out of it and worse if they try to look inside as if I am protecting something inside there. I was wondering what kind of anger that would fit in? What could be the possible psychology and biology behind this?

Anyhow, like always. Loved your post. I learnt something new, as well as indulged in a lot of self-analysis. Thanks once again for sharing this piece.

Have a great day.
🙂

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Oh my @scienceblocks what a wonderful comment this is. Filled with honest, non-judgmental self-reflection. This is truly the right road towards personal growth :)

I have always held the grudge. And I have not forgotten a single one of those incidences.

Oftentimes this happens because of individuals' cognitive style. Those who tend to present this mode of thinking are understood to be ruminators ref.

Does any animal show prolonged grudge? Like does anger have a role to play beyond fight part of fight or flight response in them?

These are interesting questions indeed :) And, I have written them down to look into them later on, when I have some free time. It may answer many of my own queries. But, the thought of non-human animals holding a persistent ill-feeling towards something that happened a long time ago, is a difficult one to fathom.

The most frequent kind of rage I display is related to someone trying to push me out of my comfort zone. Not entitlement.

Here, it would be interesting if you could identify the thoughts that go through your head when this happens. Through pinpointing them you may unveil what is that makes you angry. Do they feature any cognitive distortion? For example: (1)inaccurate assumptions of what the other person is thinking, (2)jumping to conclusions about the other person's intentions, and so forth.

That would explain the psychology behind it (the cognitive style). As for the biology, all the neurobiological mechanisms underlying rumination (or repetitive thinking for that matter). Rumination has been found to correlate, for example, with activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and posterior cingulate cortex ref.

Your comment is very kind and encouraging @scienceblocks. It makes all the time and energy I put into my work here on the platform worthwhile. I feel very grateful for all those of you who read my writings. It means the world to me.

Thank you so much for taking the time to let me know that, somehow, this post has had a positive impact on you. Thank you :)

All the best to you. Always and forever!
Abigail.