Meeting between Justin Sun, Korean Stakeholders.

in #steemlast year (edited)

I saw @ausbitbank writed an article titled Meeting between Justin Sun, Korean Stakeholders, Steem Witnesses and Steem Foundation 12/03/2020.

I don't know much about cryptocurrencies, but I recently discovered a hot issue that Steemit was acquired by Tron.
In my opinion, it seems that Stemit runs on the American voting system and stock trading. By the way, Tron is a virtual currency of China different from the American system.

Americans, including @valued-customer, seem to be opposing Tron's acquisition of Steem.

That reveals it's existential import to the Steem community, particularly now, after it has been used to seize control of consensus by one stakeholder with ~1/5 - 1/3 of extant Steem. It is easy to understand how 30x weighting of that stake enables complete control of governance. What is disappointing is that the legacy consensus witnesses that have heretofore benefited from oligarchical power over governance remain unwilling to fix this flaw in DPoS that threatens to completely centralize Steem today.

I have little hope that the choice between an upstart overlord and the legacy oligarchy will enable Steem to actually gain greater decentralization of governance.

@maxsieg claimed that Korean society was isolated.

its so strange that the korean community is so eager about justins proposed changes. like they live in a complete separate community with own perspectives completely not influenced by us or us by them. so disconnected despite being on the same blockchain

The arguments of the two will each be probable. However, I also thought that there was a lack of information about Koreans and Korean society in foreign countries.
The language and cultural barriers between Koreans and foreigners were still large.

As @maxsieg claims, Koreans may be in an isolated environment, but the most important thing is to understand Korean thoughts and feelings.

Through the conversation of @valued-customer and the Prince of China, I tried to express the history, religion, faith, philosophy, and emotions of East Asian civilization in English.
However, writing was difficult due to my lack of English skills.

Americans and Europeans I met usually identified Korea with Japan. A Frenchman were surprised that Korea used its own language and text even though it was a Japanese colony.
He first asked in Japanese, but I couldn't speak Japanese, so we spoke in English.
Americans and Europeans seemed to know that Korea was a Japanese colony. Do you know that there are 10 million Korean Protestants and Catholics like me?
However, there were many Westerners who believed that Korea is a Buddhist country like Japan.

In fact, Koreans created their own texts and languages to become independent in the Chinese character civilization.

The Korean alphabet, known as Hangul (Hangeul)[note 1] in South Korea or Chosŏn'gŭl in North Korea, has been used to write the Korean language since its creation in the 15th century by King Sejong the Great.[2][3]
It is the official writing system of Korea, both South Korea and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County in Jilin Province, China. It is also sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language spoken near the town of Baubau, Indonesia. A Taiwanese linguist Xu Caode (1987) developed and used a modified Hangul alphabet to represent spoken Taiwanese Hokkien, and was later supported by Ang Ui-jin (see Taiwanese Hangul).[4][5]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangul

However, it was actually an independent country because it belonged to China's economic sphere, but diplomatically acted as a servant of the Chinese emperor. The most dangerous enemies to China were the Manchus and the Mongols, where Chinese emperors bought the nations of the Korean Peninsula and held back their enemies.
Since ancient times, Koreans have received money from Chinese emperors, and have held back Manchuria and Mongolians.

On the other hand, Japan was neglected because the Chinese emperor had no political or economic interests, and eventually Japan invaded for China's wealth.
The brutal invasion of Japanese pirates destroyed the Korean and Chinese dynasties.

Wokou (Chinese: 倭寇; pinyin: Wōkòu; Japanese: Wakō; Korean: 왜구 Waegu), which literally translates to "Japanese pirates" or "dwarf pirates", were pirates who raided the coastlines of China and Korea from the 4th century to the 16th century.[1] The wokou came from Japanese, Korean, and Chinese ethnicities which varied over time and raided the mainland from islands in the Sea of Japan and East China Sea.[2] Wokou activity in Korea declined after the Gihae Eastern Expedition of the Joseon in 1419, but continued in Ming China and peaked during the Jiajing wokou raids in the mid-1500s, but Chinese reprisals and strong clamp downs on pirates by Japanese authorities saw the wokou virtually disappear by the 1600s.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wokou

Koreans and Chinese have been frightened by calling Japanese Wokou (Chinese: 倭寇; pinyin: Wōkòu; Japanese: Wakō; Korean: 왜구 Waegu), because they have been plagued by Japanese pirates for hundreds of years.
Westerners believe that modern Japan is an advanced country, but Korea and China are seen as pirates that have been plagued for centuries. So, Korea and China had recognized Japan as a common enemy.

Japan started World War II to conquer China and was conquered by the United States. The United States has raised Japan as a great power to stop communist empires.
Although the United States has raised Japan as a western developed country, Koreans still doubt Japan.
In particular, Korean Christians are sorry that the United States cannot make Japan a Christian nation.
I am sorry that a respected Christian like @roleerob has not made Japan a Christian nation.

In my personal opinion, Japan changed from a wolf to a gentle sheep after receiving the wealth of the United States.
The United States gave it a whip and a carrot, so the wolf became a sheep.
With the US dollar now, Japan has become rich, but with the development of China, Japan's wealth is disappearing.

In the past, Japan belonged to the US economy and became rich through manufacturing. However, the Japanese economy is currently falling due to China's manufacturing industry.
Since ancient times, Japan has invaded Korea and China because of lack of food and resources.

As the manufacturing industry leans, Japan becomes a military power and attempts a new revival.
The United States supports Japan's military consolidation, but South Korea and China have different positions.
So, South Korea wants China to check Japan to some extent.

I'm not good at English, so I wrote only the historical and geopolitical parts.
I don't know much about cryptocurrency, SteemMit, and Tron.

Koreans have a different opinion than Americans because they value politics, military, geopolitics, and history more than the economy.
I'm reading @valued-customer's article to study SteemMit and cryptocurrency, but it's hard to understand.
You should liked to first know that only a handful of Koreans are understanding and investing in Steem and Tron.

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Thank you for writing this post @silvergrifin007. One of the fascinating aspects of choosing to invest any of my time into our Steem blockchain, is the opportunity to engage with others ****all over the world****. And, in doing so, learn how the world appears through "their eyes."

Your post gives me a deeper appreciation for how Korea views history, in general, and how they view the Japanese, in particular.

In spite of our cultural and language differences, my Korean friend ...

"In particular, Korean Christians are sorry that the United States cannot make Japan a Christian nation. I am sorry that a respected Christian like @roleerob has not made Japan a Christian nation."

... I cannot understand how Google translator (or whatever translation tool you are using ...) has worded this. Key words in these sentences are "make" and "made." You surely know, when it comes to man's salvation, there is no force involved. Man must voluntarily submit and surrender to what God's Word tell us is necessary for salvation.


... Google 번역기 (또는 사용중인 번역 도구)가 어떻게 이런 말을했는지 이해할 수 없습니다. 이 문장에서 핵심 단어는 "make"와 "made"입니다. 사람의 구원에 관해서는 아무런 힘이 없습니다. 사람은 자발적으로 하나님의 말씀이 구원에 필요하다고 말씀하신 것에 복종해야합니다.


That said, I have read history books written by Christian authors of what America may have missed as an opportunity, at the conclusion of the Second World War. So brutal and destructive was our war with the Japanese, that we had insisted on an unconditional surrender. With the complete humiliation of Hirohito, the god (small, very small "g" ...) of the Japanese culture, America had an opportunity to have a tremendous influence on what the Japanese would view as their new "god." Sadly, there was not enough done to make that more of a Judeo-Christian influence vs. simply an economic one, where the Japanese would be influenced to "worship" the "almighty" dollar ...

If you don't mind my asking @silvergrifin007, how old are you? Perhaps you have written that somewhere and I missed it. If that, however, is viewed as an offensive question in Korean culture, please feel free to ignore it.

.. I cannot understand how Google translator (or whatever translation tool you are using ...) has worded this. Key words in these sentences are "make" and "made." You surely know, when it comes to man's salvation, there is no force involved. Man must voluntarily submit and surrender to what God's Word tell us is necessary for salvation.

Dear my American senior. Thanks for your kind answer. I think I wrote an offensive sentence to you because my English is poor. Like your claim, only God gives man salvation. I only meant that Koreans were suspicious and afraid of Japan because Japan did not become a Christian nation.

That said, I have read history books written by Christian authors of what America may have missed as an opportunity, at the conclusion of the Second World War. So brutal and destructive was our war with the Japanese, that we had insisted on an unconditional surrender. With the complete humiliation of Hirohito, the god (small, very small "g" ...) of the Japanese culture, America had an opportunity to have a tremendous influence on what the Japanese would view as their new "god." Sadly, there was not enough done to make that more of a Judeo-Christian influence vs. simply an economic one, where the Japanese would be influenced to "worship" the "almighty" dollar ...

I believe that the United States' war with Japan was correct given the brutality and crimes committed by the Japanese against Asians during World War II.
After the US conquered Japan, the fact that the United States developed Japan into a western developed country was a compassionate act.
However, the Japanese only wanted American wealth and rejected Christianity. So, Koreans are afraid of the Japanese.
If we cannot wash away human sins with the Holy Spirit and Blood of Jesus, the evil nature will come to life again.
So, I am sorry that the United States has not made Japan a Christian nation. I am afraid that the nature of the Japanese will come back to life.

If you don't mind my asking @silvergrifin007, how old are you? Perhaps you have written that somewhere and I missed it. If that, however, is viewed as an offensive question in Korean culture, please feel free to ignore it.

I am a 45 years old Korean Protestant. Younger than you? smile!

Very good my friend. You commonly reply with the word "offensive," which I am guessing may be a result of the differences in our cultures. So I will again try to set your mind at ease on that point:

I am not offended! You would really have to go out of your way to offend me, as I will typically assume good intentions. Unless I have a very good reason to do otherwise ... 🙂

나는 기분 나쁘지 않다! 내가 일반적으로 좋은 의도를 가정 할 것이기 때문에 당신은 나를 화나게하는 길을 떠나야 할 것입니다. 달리할만한 이유가 없다면 ... 🙂

Your views are very helpful for me and others to understand the Korean perspective, when it comes to China and Japan. Given your country's history with both, I can only imagine the concerns recent events raise.

I have traveled extensively over my long life. It has saddened me, more than once, to see the influence of America on other parts of the world. Not even a hint of a Christian influence. Instead, almost always a very secular, materialistic influence ...

Thank you for sharing your age @silvergrifin007. I am 65 years old. 😉

You commonly reply with the word "offensive," which I am guessing may be a result of the differences in our cultures. So I will again try to set your mind at ease on that point:

My dear American senior. I'm not good at English, so I hope you understand. It seems that the word unpleasant than offensive is appropriate.