Parable of the talent

The parable of the talents (also the parable of the Minas), is one of the most inspiring parables of Jesus.
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Matthew 25:14–30
Luke 19:11–27

Although, the basic story in each of these parables is the same, the differences between the parables as they appear in the Gospel of Matthew and Luke are quite sufficient to indicate that the parables are not obtained from the same source.
In the book of Matthew, the opening words link the parable to the preceding parable of the Ten virgins, which refers to the kingdom of Heaven. The version in Luke is called the Parable of the Pounds.
In both books (Matthew and Luke), a master puts his servants in charge of his goods while he is away on a trip. Upon his return, the master seek to assess the stewardship of his servants. He evaluated them accordingly yearning on their faithfulness, in obtaining wisest counsel in investments of his goods to obtaining profits.
Obviously, the master sought some profit from the servant's oversight. Gain in business to him, indicated faithfulness on the part of the servants. The master rewards his servants according to how each has handled his stewardship. He judged two of his servants as been "faithful" and gave them a positive reward. Whilst the unfaithful servant who played streetsmart,got a negative compensation.

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What's a talent?
Scripturally, a talent is a unit of weight approximately 80 pounds (36kg) and when used as a unit of currency, was worth about 6,000 denarii. A denarius was the usual payment for a day's labour. At one denarius per day, a single talent was therefore worth 16 years of labour.
Hmm...Astonishing! Right??

What does this parable teach us about living our lives today as we await his coming?

First, the story starts with these simple words...

“It will be like a man going on a journey, who called his servants and entrusted his property to them.” (Matthew 25: 14)

Even as he sets the stage, Jesus is telling us something important: we have an entrustment. Everything we have is given to us by God. Do we see ourselves as stewards or owners? The answer makes all the difference.

A steward lives for the day he will return the Master’s goods to Him. An owner believes his possessions are his to spend in any way he sees fit. All we have–our material goods, our abilities, and even our very lives–belong to someone else. We are merely holding them for the day of reckoning.

We learn next that each servant has a different amount of money entrusted to him, “Each according to his ability.” (Matthew 25: 15) Apparently, Everyone receives something, but not everyone receives the same amount.
The difference is how we utilize the opportunities and talents given to us by God.

We are oftentimes, tempted to complain too much but how have we used our talents and resources to serve the Lord?
Are we comfortable professing Christ at our work place against odds?

The second coming is not only about Jesus, and not merely about others, it is also about us. In the last day we, too, have a role to play.

Sometimes our view of the Second Coming is so centered on the Judgment of God that we have overlooked the joyful nature of his return for those who are prepared. Perhaps this is why the Old Testament prophets referred to Christ’s return as the “great and glorious day of the Lord.” (Joel 2:31)

On his return, Jesus will look for those whom he can invite into his joy. True, there will be judgment, but the Master’s motivation is to share his happiness with all those who have longed for his coming.

What’s the Lesson?

Only those who eagerly anticipate the return of Christ can find the freedom to live with confidence now. Apostle Paul understood the freedom we can experience through the grace of God when he recounted the words, “‘My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.’ Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknesses, so that Christ’s power may rest on me.” (II Corinthians 12: 9).
How patient are we with God's given talent in our quest for monetary things and other worldly things??
How do we utilize these skills adequately in the light and path of God?

..Our greatest talent and treasure is our ability to love, and in this enterprise the champion is the greatest risk taker, which means the one most willing to invest himself where the odds appear most against him

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